Hong Kong Ocean Terminal

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Location:
Hong Kong
Sector:
Leisure and Sports, MBA International

The proposal for the Ocean Terminal Extension involves a new building and visitor attraction situated at the tip of the Ocean Terminal site. It features an observation wheel with slowly ascending, aerodynamically shaped, air-conditioned passenger capsules, offering spectacular 360 degree panoramic views.

The wheel, which features an innovative hubless, spoke-free design, will create a highly bespoke landmark destination. The new proposal will link with the existing Ocean Terminal which currently serves as a Cruise Terminal, shopping complex and parking facilities.

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MBA propose a fully integrated solution involving two major components:

Sitting on top of the Ocean Terminal Extension, a 70m diameter, hubless wheel will form an iconic landmark structure providing unparalleled views and a new viewing experience across the Harbour. Designed to attract local and international visitors in the region of 500,000 per year it will become a new symbol within the dramatic Hong Kong skyline. Traditionally Ferris wheel attractions involve a rotating rim connected to a central hub and spindle, however a unique approach has been taken in the design of the Ocean Terminal wheel attraction in providing a clear unobstructed space within the rim using the device of a static rim structure which is integrated into the base building and transfers loading directly through to the marine deck and pile foundations. Self leveling viewing capsules are subsequently driven by a traction system around the outer face of the rim structure.

Conceptually the two forms are distinct, one a 70m diameter ring and the other a 60m x 60m x 35m cube. A further requirement of the brief to align the wheel attraction at a specific angle of 218 degrees north (Fung Shui) results in an interesting meeting of the two components. To overcome this and create a homogenous solution the design proposal involves bringing the wheel experience into the base building, and unifying the structural language between the two forms.

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